Palliser Trail

palliser trail by tina monod - acrylic on wood panel 24x24x2

Kicking Horse River – Yoho National Park, British Columbia

Every landscape is a vision of adventure and has a unique story to tell. The origins of Kicking Horse River begin with a geologist named Sir James Hector. From 1857-1860 he was part of the Palliser Expedition to explore or survey the open prairies and rugged wilderness of western Canada. As the team’s surgeon and geologist, James played an essential role in exploring new routes for the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) and discovering many new species of plants.

History tells us that in 1858 he was kicked by his packhorse at this beautiful river, high up in the Canadian Rockies of Southeastern British Columbia. Kicking Horse has attracted many explorers ever since. This painting is named “Palliser Trail” to honour the expedition and renew that sense of wonder… a feeling of something more, just down the path and around the river’s bend.

This river adds balance to a composition of sky, mountain and forest. Clouds in the top left rush in, sending a cool mountain breeze down the valley – to parallel the moving water. There is an easy flow from the mountains to river and from there life blossoms outwards. The river bank is vibrant in energy and feng shui. It is lush and inviting with rainbow colours and the brushwork is free flowing adding clarity. Freedom, balance and pure potential are strong emotional elements in this work of original art.

“Palliser Trail” is part of a new painting series called “Mapping the Great Divide”. This new collection by Canadian artist and designer Tina Monod celebrates a journey, majestic mountains, family heritage and Canada’s 150th birthday year. These fresh O’ Canada landscapes help one to appreciate and enjoy the incredible beauty and freedom of a country rich in nature, history and culture. We are so fortunate to have national parks like these to explore.

palliser trail by tina monod - acrylic on wood panel 24x24x2
“Palliser Trail” © Tina Monod, Acrylic on Wood Panel 24x24x2″

Available for purchase

Mapping the Great Divide

Mapping the Great Divide is a collection of landscapes painted with acrylics onto gallery canvas. Each painting is 24×24″ with a depth of 1.5″ and a painted edge, ready for hanging. These paintings explore some of Canada’s most beautiful national parks and Unesco world heritage sites. Each mountain image explores the Canadian Rockies from Revelstoke, British Columbia to Banff, Alberta. This series by Canadian artist and designer Tina Monod is about mountain culture, elevation and the beauty of mountains in Canada.

Guided Grandeur

Prismatic Pass

Odaray Mountain Light

First Snowfall

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Purchase paintings by Tina Monod

Odaray Mountain Light

odaray mountain light by tina monod - acrylic on wood panel 24x24x2

Yoho National Park – Field, British Columbia

One of the best things about climbing mountains is when you take a moment to look back and see just how far you have come. Often in art we see mountains as solid pillars, sentinels rendered against a quiet sky. I like to combine strengths, so for this piece I have painted both the sky and the mountain below with equality. The mountains lend their strength to all around them and the sky envelopes all with its power. The effect is luminous and full of changing light, which I like to call a gathering of elements. This is not just any mountain.

In choosing a place to paint, geography and history are very important. It is not enough to say that I was inspired here. There is always a story which I am adding to. With an elevation of 3,159 m this landmark on the west side of the Lake O’Hara valley stands tall and impressive. Odaray comes from the Stoney First Nation Nakoda expression for “many waterfalls.” The name Odaray was given by Joseph James McArthur in 1887 when he was a Dominion Land Surveyor working in the Canadian Rockies, mapping the terrain on either side of the Canadian Pacific Railway line. He was the “First Canadian Mountaineer.” One can only imagine the challenges J.J encountered.

To focus on this challenge of painting mountains, I begin with a simple line that will traverse the landscape and become more defined. This is the path and a route upon which the eye visually travels. One might look into the studio and see me painting the ascent and descent with just air on my brushes. Something like a conductor waving a baton, and all according to a plan. It is in this arrangement that I visualize the presence and scale of the landscape. For me mountains are more than shapes of elevation. Odaray Mountain is unique. It is calm, stable and unmoving like a sleeping giant with nature stirring all around. My brushes are so busy capturing these sensations. It begins to sound more like I am drumming than painting. This amuses me and the dance begins.

When a painting explores a good fluidity of style it creates its own atmosphere of living breathing colour. One looks upwards to feel the cool mountain air and finds the wind ready to change. Upon lowering one’s gaze there is the sharp smell of fresh yet invisible snow, a clear message. Tiny snowflakes melt high up in the sky and barely make it down to the ground. Here in the middle of autumn the changes are magical. All the layers of this landscape float naturally with very little definition or boundary to give that last lingering feeling of summer. Great art collections grow in moments like these! This is the passion of being an artist and mastering creativity.

Every painting needs a resting space for the eye. Often the sky is the most natural area to create more of an opening with looser brushwork or a bare minimum of colour. Areas of shade can also create that visual rest. In the case of Odaray Mountain with its great height, I have chosen the centre of the painting. Here a valley will slope gently to create that nice reprieve. I will also allow the underpainting to show through a bit more in the top edges. Quinacridone Burnt Orange is the base that warms the sky on this sweet September day. This is a happy time where several seasons blend into one.

“Odaray Mountain Light” is part of a new painting series called “Mapping the Great Divide”. This new collection by artist and designer Tina Monod celebrates a journey, majestic mountains, family heritage and Canada’s 150th birthday year. These fresh O’ Canada landscapes help one to appreciate and enjoy the incredible beauty and freedom of a country rich in nature, history and culture. We are so fortunate to have national parks like these to explore.

odaray mountain light by tina monod - acrylic on wood panel 24x24x2
“Odaray Mountain Light” © Tina Monod, Acrylic on Wood Panel 24x24x2″

Available for purchase

Mapping the Great Divide

Mapping the Great Divide is a collection of landscapes painted with acrylics onto gallery canvas. Each painting is 24×24″ with a depth of 1.5″ and a painted edge, ready for hanging. These paintings explore some of Canada’s most beautiful national parks and Unesco world heritage sites. Each mountain image explores the Canadian Rockies from Revelstoke, British Columbia to Banff, Alberta. This series by Canadian artist and designer Tina Monod is about mountain culture, elevation and the beauty of mountains in Canada.

Guided Grandeur

Prismatic Pass

Palliser Trail

First Snowfall

Shop Art

Purchase paintings by Tina Monod

First Snowfall

first snowfall by tina monod - acrylic on wood panel 24x24x2

Selkirk Mountains, Mount Revelstoke National Park, British Columbia

When it snows, I see how everything is connected. That soft gray backdrop behind the falling snowflakes becomes a veil of softest blue and pale green. Elements of this landscape become strong and forever… while others swirl and transition.

Painting “First Snowfall” is about a journey I made last September to reconnect with family and the amazing power of mountains. The greater the elevation, the happier I became. It was good to be back home in western Canada and fuelled with artistic inspiration. This piece is the first in my new series “Mapping the Great Divide” which celebrates places in the Canadian Rockies. So many of these majestic spaces simply and endlessly inspire the O’ Canada in all of us!

This image from Mount Revelstoke National Park really captures my imagination with all the elements of rock, wind, sky and forest. Snow has so many variations to capture and makes this view so captivating. Some areas are distinctly snowy and others gently merge with the divisions of white space and colour. As a painter my challenge was to work with the changing fog and mountain air. So with conditions both atmospheric and mysterious I began to recreate this experience on canvas. As I explored this terrain, there was a focus on the couloirs. My one thought was that this landscape should be skiable. If I can ski it, I can paint it – and off I go!

Much of my time in the studio was spent seeing the many shades of white that this piece allows. There is a feeling of peace in these mountains and a purposeful wind carrying that first snowfall downward and into the valley. Behind the layers of transparency my brushes lift nature’s veil. Wisps of snowy powder filter through the treetops. Pure magic! The brushwork stands on its own, silent with a light echo. Such a thrill to experience the snow falling in September at the beginning of this journey home.

Sometimes I think that mountains are a means for achieving our personal goals in life. That said I believe that they are landmarks of strength, which we embrace through ascents and descents. That good fortune is a true give and take, exhilarating and a true reward. Painting a sky that relates to the strength of this mountain and changing weather patterns was a creative lesson of its own. It is also just the beginning of many perceptions and recognitions.

“First Snowfall” is part of a new painting series called “Mapping the Great Divide”. This new collection by artist and designer Tina Monod celebrates a journey, majestic mountains, family heritage and Canada’s 150th birthday year. These fresh O’ Canada landscapes help one to appreciate and enjoy the incredible beauty and freedom of a country rich in nature, history and culture. We are so fortunate to have national parks like these to explore.

first snowfall by tina monod - acrylic on wood panel 24x24x2
“First Snowfall” © Tina Monod, Acrylic on Wood Panel 24x24x2″

Available for purchase

Mapping the Great Divide

Mapping the Great Divide is a collection of landscapes painted with acrylics onto gallery canvas. Each painting is 24×24″ with a depth of 1.5″ and a painted edge, ready for hanging. These paintings explore some of Canada’s most beautiful national parks and Unesco world heritage sites. Each mountain image explores the Canadian Rockies from Revelstoke, British Columbia to Banff, Alberta. This series by Canadian artist and designer Tina Monod is about mountain culture, elevation and the beauty of mountains in Canada.

Guided Grandeur

Prismatic Pass

Palliser Trail

Odaray Mountain Light

Shop Art

Purchase paintings by Tina Monod